Racialicious

Racialicious is a blog about the intersection of race and pop culture. Check out our updates on the latest celebrity gaffes, our no-holds-barred critique of questionable media representations. If you've been on the blog, you know how this Tumblr works, too. Including the moderation policy.
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Posts tagged "transitions"

theycallmemrsharp:

 

Renowned Novelist CHINUA ACHEBE (November 1930-March 2013)

From NYT.com:

But over the years, Mr. Achebe’s stature grew until he was considered a literary and political beacon.

“In all Achebe’s writing there is an intense moral energy,” observed Kwame Anthony Appiah, professor of Afro-American studies and philosophy at Princeton, in a commentary published in 2000. “He speaks about the task of the writer in language that captures the sense of threat and loss that must have faced many Africans as empire invaded and disrupted their lives.”

In a 1998 book review in The New York Times, the South African novelist Nadine Gordimer, a Nobel laureate, hailed Mr. Achebe as “a novelist who makes you laugh and then catch your breath in horror — a writer who has no illusions but is not disillusioned.”

Mr. Achebe’s political thinking evolved from blaming colonial rule for Africa’s woes to frank criticism of African rulers and the African citizens who tolerated their corruption and violence.

As a child and adolescent, he immersed himself in Western literature. At the University College of Ibadan, whose professors were Europeans, Mr. Achebe avidly read Shakespeare, Milton, Defoe, Swift, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats and Tennyson. But it was the required reading of a novel set in Nigeria and written by an Anglo-Irishman, Joyce Cary, that proved to be the turning point in his education.

Titled”Mister Johnson,”the 1952 book, which culminates when its docile Nigerian protagonist is shot to death by his British master, was hailed by the white faculty and in the Western press as one of the best novels ever written about Africa. But as Mr. Achebe wrote, he and his classmates responded with “exasperation at this bumbling idiot of a character whom Joyce Cary and our teacher were so assiduously passing off as a poet when he was nothing but an embarrassing nitwit!”

For Mr. Achebe, the novel aroused his first deep stirrings of anti-colonialism and a desire to use literature as a weapon against Western biases. “In the end, I began to understand,” he wrote. “There is such a thing as absolute power over narrative. Those who secure this privilege for themselves can arrange stories about others pretty much where, and as, they like.”

A whole generation of West African writers was coming to the same realization in the 1950s. A Nigerian, Amos Tutuola, opened the floodgates of literature in the region with his 1952 novel, “The Palm-Wine Drunkard.” Soon afterward came another Nigerian, Cyprian Ekwensi, with “People of the City”; the Guinean writer Camara Laye, with “L’Enfant Noir”; Mongo Beti of Cameroon, with “Poor Christ of Bomba”; and the Senegalese writer, Cheikh Hamidou Kane, with “Ambiguous Adventure.”

Rest in peace, Elder Achebe. And thank you.

(via ethiopienne)

iamdavidbrothers:

I want you to keep this two-page story by Matt Wayne, John Paul Leon, Noelle Giddings, and Dave Sharpe in mind this month. I want you to think of this every time someone — anyone, myself included — invokes Dwayne McDuffie’s name.

I want you to think about what they have to gain when they say the man’s name.

I’m not even a comics fan, and this got me choked up a little.

(via racebending)

tyndalecode:

Russell C. Means, the charismatic Oglala Sioux who helped revive the warrior image of the American Indian in the 1970s with guerrilla-tactic protests that called attention to the nation’s history of injustices against its indigenous peoples, died on Monday at his ranch in Porcupine, S.D., on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. He was 72.

harvestheart:

Green Mile’ actor Michael Clarke Duncan dead at 54

Frederick M. Brown / Getty Images

Actor Michael Clarke Duncan was best known for his role in “The Green Mile.” 

Michael Clarke Duncan, the actor who earned an Oscar nomination for his role in “The Green Mile,” has died after complications from a July heart attack, his fiancee says. He was 54.

Publicist Joy Fehily released a statement from Clarke’s fiancee, the Rev. Omarosa Manigault, saying the actor died Monday morning in a Los Angeles hospital after nearly two months of treatment following the July 13 heart attack.   

“The Oscar-nominated actor suffered a myocardial infarction on July 13 and never fully recovered.  Manigault is grateful for all of your prayers and asks for privacy at this time.  Celebrations of his life, both private and public, will be announced at a later date,” the statement said.

The 6-foot-5, 300-pound Duncan appeared in dozens of films, including such box office hits as “Armageddon,” “Planet of the Apes” and “Kung Fu Panda.”   

According to The Associated Press, Duncan had a handful of minor roles before “The Green Mile” brought him an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actor. Duncan played John Coffey, a convicted murderer, in the 1999 film, based on the Stephen King novel of the same name, that starred Tom Hanks as a corrections officer at a penitentiary in the 1930s. 

HH: “Coffey like the drink, only not spelled the same.”  I found him to be a great addition to Two and a Half Men.

(via biyuti)

It was only fitting, in this modern age, that news of the death of Mexican author, diplomat, and social critic Carlos Fuentes, spread via Twitter. And it was just as befitting of his stature that the person who broke the news was the President of México himself, Felipe Calderón.

That kind of acknowledgement from the highest political circles might’ve amused Fuentes; as recently as the 1980s, his name and works were practically verboten in the public-school curriculum mandated by the country’s ruling party of seven decades, the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). Far from being a loyal party subject, Fuentes, the son of a diplomat, resigned from his post as Mexico’s ambassador to France in 1977 after the PRI named Gustavo Díaz Ordaz—the former president who sanctioned the 1968 massacre of student protestors at Tlatelolco Plaza in Mexico City—to be his colleague. The party also hovered over one of his more celebrated works, The Death of Artemio Cruz.

"There was no need to mention the PRI," he once told The Associated Press. "It is present by its absence."

In his absence, Fuentes’ presence will be remembered not just because of his sheer dedication—he published more than 50 works spanning literature, theater, and film, beginning with La Región Más Transparente (Where The Air Is Clear) in 1957—but because of his influence on the other writers who would fuel the Latin American “Boom” movement. As University of California-Riverside Professor Raymond L. Williams told the AP, Fuentes was responsible for galvanizing other preeminent authors, like Gabriel García Márquez, Julio Cortázar, and Mario Vargas Llosa into a collective.

"It took Fuentes’ vision to say if we unite forces and provide a common political and literary voice, we’ll have more impact," Williams told the AP. "His home in Pedregal (an upscale Mexico City neighborhood) was the intellectual center what brought a lot of writers together."

Fuentes was creative, almost literally, to the very end: not only is his latest book, Vlad, scheduled for release this July (“I loved the old Dracula movies,” he told Publishers Weekly)—but an essay he penned on the recent presidential elections in France was published in the Mexican newspaper Reforma the day he died, just 24 hours after his interview with the Spanish newspaper El Día was printed, in which he revealed that he had completed another book, and planned to start another.

So, it’s only fitting to let this consummate man of words speak for himself. Today, we join readers, writers, and fans of the written word all over the world in celebrating Fuentes’ singular vision.

The comics world lost a pioneer last week with the passing of artist Tony DeZuniga, who died in the Philippines from complications from a stroke. DeZuniga is best known for being the co-creator of DC Comics characters Black Orchid and Jonah Hex.

DeZuniga’s association with Hex would span almost four decades: 38 years after introducing the character in All-Star Western in 1972, DeZuniga returned to draw Hex for a stand-alone graphic novel, Jonah Hex: No Way Back.

DeZuniga began working as an artist in his native Philippines as a teenager in the 1950s, during the country’s boom period for comics (or Komics, as they were called). In the early 1960s he moved to New York to study graphic design and advertising, a career he would pursue for a few years before returning to the U.S. toward the end of the decade and earning art assignments from DC editor Joe Orlando. DeZuniga became the first Filipino artist to break into the American comics market.

But more importantly, DeZuniga made sure he wasn’t the last to do so…

secretarysbreakroom:

Before we go on about our day here at the R, I just want to take a moment to remember what this day is: the day Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated.

Which, thanks to him, brings the picture of POTUS Obama and Nichelle Nichols to a poignant point in the spiral of history.

(via mylovelylifelongings-deactivate)

luvyourselfsomeesteem:

aichlee:

A Great Day in Harlem - Art Kane, 1958
A Great Day in Harlem Survivors - Gordon Parks, 1996

lovely & sad.

People leave, things change but the memory is still there.

(via karnythia)

What’s sad is that Whitney’s death was shocking but not surprising. What’s sad is that the news seemed overdue and inevitable. That’s what a Greek tragedy feels like.

I remember standing outside Boiler Room years ago. I had too much to drink and a patron was flirting with me. He was telling me how beautiful I was and how I looked like no one else in the bar. I didn’t know how to respond to this compliment. My mind thought of beauty and in a beer haze I started babbling about Whitney Houston. I told him about my favorite performance: “Why Does It Hurt So Bad.” I gave an aesthetic breakdown of the perfect performance. The way Whitney Houston manipulated and guided the pace. Her body language and delivery. That was beautiful. and in the midst of a meaningless MTV Movie Awards Show.

He nodded along, but I could tell he was pretending. I recognized that nodding. It was “I’ll agree with whatever you want if you like me back.” I wanted him to really understand so I began to further explain why the performance was perfect. He continued nodding like a bobble head and exclaiming “wow” and “so fascinating” as I attempted to break through to him. It wasn’t working. I excused myself, hopped on the subway, and went home.

Aurin Squire remembers Whitney Houston at the R.