Racialicious

Racialicious is a blog about the intersection of race and pop culture. Check out our updates on the latest celebrity gaffes, our no-holds-barred critique of questionable media representations. If you've been on the blog, you know how this Tumblr works, too. Including the moderation policy.
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Posts tagged "history"
kingjaffejoffer:

holliebunni:

“This was seen by my nephew who is attending SDSU in his dorm bathroom our young Lakota men & women who are attending higher education institutions are also being educated on how racism still exists with their neighbors. For many of us who experience this for many years we learned how to tolerate this, yet for these young people they are traumatized.” - Wayne Weston
 
PLEASE REBLOG.


I love how black people still get insulted when we aren’t even the target of the insult. 
Prairie Nigger. Sand Nigger. The source of all world niggers trickle down from us. We are the Nigger API and everyone else builds nigger apps on top of our code.  

So I debated reblogging this in its full form for a bit.  If this was old Racialicious, circa 2010 or before, there would have been no hesitation - Carmen & I were both in favor of not treating words with kid gloves for various reasons.   In 2014, most contributors are uncomfortable using racial slurs in their full form, so we’ve widely stopped using them on site. (Our official policy is that we generally don’t censor - it’s the contributor’s choice and they assume responsibility for whatever fallout occurs.)
But this framework of a nigger API was too good to let pass. One, it illuminates the lie that is race - if how we construct racial distinctions isn’t a fiction, calling someone a derivative of nigger would make no sense. It would invalidate the basis of slur. But racism doesn’t follow any logic but its own.  
Two, how we use language to reinforce that the worse thing to be in this world is a nigger- other slurs are built on top of the term, not in addition to the term, though every racial group has been saddled with their own respective slurs.
Three, the idea of a nigger API makes me think of a racism API, which is one of our core arguments all along - oppression operates in the same formats, runs the same scripts over and over. It is tweaked to be context specific, but it’s all the same source code. And the key to its undoing is recognizing how many of us are ensnared in these same basic patterns and modifying our own actions.
And four, even engaging with terms on this level shows the violence inherent in slurs and how they are calibrated for maximum damage. No doubt, people are going to flinch and feel triggered seeing this pop up on their dash, in the same way those poor students had to flinch and feel triggered while getting their education. In that way, the slur is effective - even looking at the hastily scrawled word prompts an immediate reaction.
But sharing  kingjaffejoffer's comment will also create some very complicated situations - in using the term to illuminate a dynamic, a new kind of gate is opened. Is it possible to utilize a racial slur to illuminate an oppressive dynamic without falling prey to that dynamic?
In the 1960s, activists attempted to use to use a term called “niggerization” to discuss a process.  One of the most famous of those was Flo Kennedy, who said:
Niggerization is the result of oppression—and it doesn’t just apply to the black people. Old people, poor people, and students can also get niggerized. 
 http://quotes.dictionary.com/niggerization_is_the_result_of_oppression_and_it#WbPlxk5jKEFW3fgD.99
However, it was too difficult to actually convey anything of substance because of the explosive nature of the term, so it falls in and out of favor. (Most recently used by Cornel West and Toure, google to see the disaster that ensued with public usage of a complicated, activism influenced term.) When a participant in Slutwalk hoisted a “woman is the nigger of the world” sign, we looked at the history of the song and appropriation of terms of oppression without a commitment of solidarity.
The nigger API is a clever turn of phrase. But as soon as I hit post and help spread this event at SDSU and the secondary comment, the slur will launch into action (quite like the malicious code currently hijacking the main site), changing the intent and meaning of this very post based on the identity of the person who posts it and their intent in sharing the post. Which ultimately means the app wins again.
Fascinating, isn’t it? - LDP

kingjaffejoffer:

holliebunni:

“This was seen by my nephew who is attending SDSU in his dorm bathroom our young Lakota men & women who are attending higher education institutions are also being educated on how racism still exists with their neighbors. For many of us who experience this for many years we learned how to tolerate this, yet for these young people they are traumatized.” - Wayne Weston

 

PLEASE REBLOG.

I love how black people still get insulted when we aren’t even the target of the insult. 

Prairie Nigger. Sand Nigger. The source of all world niggers trickle down from us. We are the Nigger API and everyone else builds nigger apps on top of our code.  

So I debated reblogging this in its full form for a bit.  If this was old Racialicious, circa 2010 or before, there would have been no hesitation - Carmen & I were both in favor of not treating words with kid gloves for various reasons.   In 2014, most contributors are uncomfortable using racial slurs in their full form, so we’ve widely stopped using them on site. (Our official policy is that we generally don’t censor - it’s the contributor’s choice and they assume responsibility for whatever fallout occurs.)

But this framework of a nigger API was too good to let pass. One, it illuminates the lie that is race - if how we construct racial distinctions isn’t a fiction, calling someone a derivative of nigger would make no sense. It would invalidate the basis of slur. But racism doesn’t follow any logic but its own.  

Two, how we use language to reinforce that the worse thing to be in this world is a nigger- other slurs are built on top of the term, not in addition to the term, though every racial group has been saddled with their own respective slurs.

Three, the idea of a nigger API makes me think of a racism API, which is one of our core arguments all along - oppression operates in the same formats, runs the same scripts over and over. It is tweaked to be context specific, but it’s all the same source code. And the key to its undoing is recognizing how many of us are ensnared in these same basic patterns and modifying our own actions.

And four, even engaging with terms on this level shows the violence inherent in slurs and how they are calibrated for maximum damage. No doubt, people are going to flinch and feel triggered seeing this pop up on their dash, in the same way those poor students had to flinch and feel triggered while getting their education. In that way, the slur is effective - even looking at the hastily scrawled word prompts an immediate reaction.

But sharing  kingjaffejoffer's comment will also create some very complicated situations - in using the term to illuminate a dynamic, a new kind of gate is opened. Is it possible to utilize a racial slur to illuminate an oppressive dynamic without falling prey to that dynamic?

In the 1960s, activists attempted to use to use a term called “niggerization” to discuss a process.  One of the most famous of those was Flo Kennedy, who said:

Niggerization is the result of oppression—and it doesn’t just apply to the black people. Old people, poor people, and students can also get niggerized.

 http://quotes.dictionary.com/niggerization_is_the_result_of_oppression_and_it#WbPlxk5jKEFW3fgD.99

However, it was too difficult to actually convey anything of substance because of the explosive nature of the term, so it falls in and out of favor. (Most recently used by Cornel West and Toure, google to see the disaster that ensued with public usage of a complicated, activism influenced term.) When a participant in Slutwalk hoisted a “woman is the nigger of the world” sign, we looked at the history of the song and appropriation of terms of oppression without a commitment of solidarity.

The nigger API is a clever turn of phrase. But as soon as I hit post and help spread this event at SDSU and the secondary comment, the slur will launch into action (quite like the malicious code currently hijacking the main site), changing the intent and meaning of this very post based on the identity of the person who posts it and their intent in sharing the post. Which ultimately means the app wins again.

Fascinating, isn’t it? - LDP

(via shadesoffantasy)

apihtawikosisan:

emciel:

clatterbane:

nativeamericannews:

Teaching Teachers the Truth About Native History in New England

After a three-week Institute on Native Americans Peter Gunn, who teaches Native American history at Williston Northampton School in Easthampton, Massachusetts told MassLive.com he’s “shredding his syllabus.”

I would love to see similar elsewhere in the East. And basically everywhere else, with all the propagandist crap that passes for history.

Awesome.

This should be mandatory for all teachers.

retrovintageglamour:

France Langford during USO tour.

From 1941, Langford was a regular singer on Bob Hope’s radio show. During World War II, she joined Hope, Jerry Colonna, guitarist Tony Romano and other performers on U.S.O. tours through Europe, North Africa, and the South Pacific, entertaining thousands of G.I.’s throughout the world. 

(via thepinupnoire)

recpoetry:

History of Juneteenth

Enjoy, and Happy Juneteenth! 

(via racismschool)

Well dear readers, I have been watching a lot of documentaries lately (the product of waiting to go back to work) so I thought I would share the one’s I have seen and my thoughts with you. However, the list alone is a multi-page word document (when I commit, I commit; Oops) so I will start with the list of African American specific documentaries and go from there:

4 Little Girls (1997)

A Man Named Pearl (2006)

A Question of Color (1992)

A. Philip Randolph: For Jobs & Freedom (1996)

African American Lives (2006)

African American Lives 2 (2008)

All of Us: Protecting Black Women Against AIDS (2009)

America Beyond the Color Line (2005)

BaadAssss Cinema: A Bold Look at 70s Blaxploitation Films (2002)

Banished (2006)

Bastards of the Party (2005)

Between Black and White (1994)

Black American Conservatism: An Exploration of Ideas (1992)

Black Is – Black Ain’t: A Personal Journey Through Black Identity (1995)

Black Like Who? (1997)

Black on Black (1968)

Blacking Up: Hip Hop’s Remix of Race and Identity (2010)

Breaking the Huddle (2008)

Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin (2002)

By River, By Rail (1998)

Chester Himes: A Rage in Harlem (2009)

Chisholm ’72: Unbought & Unbossed (2004)Citizen King (2004)

COINTELPRO: The FBI’s War on Black America (2009)

Color Adjustment (1991)

Crisis in Levittown (1957)

Dorothy Dandridge: An American Beauty (2003)

Ethnic Notions (1986)

Eyes on the Prize Series (1987)

Fannie Lou Hamer: Voting Rights Activists (2009)

Faubourg Tremé: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans (2008)

Freedom Riders (2009)

Good Hair (2009)

Goodbye Uncle Tom (1971)

Half Past Autumn: The Life and Work of Gordon Parks (2000)

Hoop Dreams (1994)

It’s a Damn Shame: Homosexuality in Hop-Hop (2006)

Jazz (2001)

Just Black?: Multi-Racial Identity (1992)

Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History (1998)

Lady Day Sings the Blues (2005)

Malcolm X: Make It Plain (1994)

Midnight Ramble: Oscar Micheaux and the Story of Race Movies (1994)

The N Word: Divided We Stand (2006)

Passin’ It On: the Black Panthers’ Search for Justice (2006)

Prom Night in Mississippi (2009)

Racism in America: Small Town 1950s Case Study

Ralph Ellison: Invisible Man, Celebrated Writer (2009)

Reconstruction: The Second Civil War (2004)

Roads to Memphis: the Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. (2010)

Scottsboro: An American Tragedy (2005)

Secret Daughter (1996)

Sisters of Selma: Bearing Witness for Change (2007)

Slavery and the Making of America (2004)

Slavery by Another Name (2012)

Soul Food Junkies (2012)

Soundtrack for a Revolution (2009)

Strange Fruit (2002)

The Abolitionists (2013)

The Black List: Volume 1 (2008)

The Black List: Volume 2 (2009)

The Black List: Volume 3

The Black Power Mixtape, 1967-1975 (2011)

The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords (1998)

The Black Wall Street

The Central Park Five (2013)

The Darker Side of Black (1996)

The Language You Cry In (1998)

The Loving Story (2011)

The Massachusetts 54th Colored Infantry (1991)

The Mirror Lied (1999)

The Murder of Emmett Till (2003)

The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow (2004)

The Two Nations of Black America (2008)

Two Dollars and A Dream (1989)

Unchained Memories: Readings From the Slave Narratives (2003)

Underground Railroad: the William Still Story (2012)

Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson (2005)

Wattstax (1973)

We Shall Overcome (1988)

When the Levies Broke (2006)

With All Deliberate Speed (2005)

(via seanpadilla)

diasporicroots:

How Ethiopian Scientist Unearth 3.3-Million-Year-Old Child

 It was another December afternoon back in 2000, spent like hundreds of others combing the rocky hills of the Dikika region, when Ethiopian scientist Zeray Alemseged heard one of his assistants nearby calling him.

“He said ‘oh, doctor I see something there,’” recalls Alemseged, who’d been excavating the hot and dry landscape for over a year, helped only by a small inexperienced crew of locals. “And I went there and I see the cheek bone part … sticking out of the rock. I turned it upside down and my jaw literally dropped.”

Instantly, Alemseged realized this was an extraordinary discovery that could make scientific history.

“Right away I could tell this is a child of a human ancestor,” says the paleoanthropologist. “You have this child in a block of sandstone, with the baby teeth still visible, very vertical forehead, small canine,” he adds. “But it’s so rare and so unbelievable that I just couldn’t accept that was the case, that what I saw was the skeleton.”

Yet Alemseged did not want to make news of his discovery public until he had a more complete picture of what he’d unearthed. So he kept it quiet as he meticulously prepared and analyzed the fossil.

“The skeleton was encaved in a block of sandstone matrix, which is very densely compact, very inured sand, so that I had to go remove the sand grain by grain,” says Alemseged.

“So I took my time, and people advised me to employ technicians, and technicians can do that job, but I said ‘no, it’s going to take as long as it takes but I’m not going to delegate this work of the exploration of this unique child to anyone else but me.’”

Alemseged then spent years in the lab painstakingly picking away the sand grain by grain. By using a super microscope, he was able to see details in the teeth embedded in the skull that revealed to him the skeleton’s age and the sex. He now knew the fossil was that of a three-year-old girl who had died 3.3 million years ago.

Finally, after more than six long years, Alemseged was ready to present to the world “Selam,” the fossil known as “the world’s oldest child.”

“When the time came to go to the press conference,” remembers Alemseged, “it was like a woman is pregnant and she is holding that baby for nine months and when the baby comes out, what happens is — in spite of the pain, in spite of the long, tedious process of carrying the baby — you see her smiling, you see her beautiful wonderful face trying to share the baby with her husband or the doctor.

“So I shared my baby with the audience but the different thing is that I was sharing a child that belonged not only to me but to humanity, to seven billion individuals.”

That press conference in 2006 turned Alemseged, who was just 31 when he’d discovered Selam, into a hero in the world of science.

Over the next few years, his work took him all over the world, winning him international admiration for his achievements. Today Alemseged is the director of anthropology at the California Academy of Sciences, a multifaceted scientific institution and museum where he combines his scientific research with his passion for public education.

Skeletal remains of “Selam,” a three-year-old girl who died 3.3 million years ago. She is the earliest skeleton of an African child ever found.

“When I got involved in this type of research I decided to not only read what has already been discovered but also to make my own discoveries and I can proudly say that I have achieved that with the discovery of Selam and many other fossils,” he says. “Those finds are finds that change textbooks, literally, so I am happy but I’m not satisfied — I will be satisfied only if I could instill the same type of psychology, the same type of excitement, the same type of passion to the next generations of Africans.”

Alemseged, a father of two, enjoys the opportunity to share his findings with the world and possibly inspire a new generation of scientists.

In recent years, he’s teamed up with other scientists from his continent to create the East African Association for Paleoanthropology, a group holding regular conferences to bring together top scientists and researchers from the region and beyond.

And while his achievements have made him a success story that young Ethiopians can aspire to, Alemseged’s efforts to create a positive impact on young Africans are just a small step toward his ultimate goals.

“I think both my family and Ethiopia are proud of me, but I still think that I still have so much to offer, not just to Ethiopia, but to Africa and to humanity in general,” he says.

“My work is beyond nations, beyond nationalities, beyond continents — it unites everyone on the planet. So when I achieve that, I’m sure Ethiopia and my family are or will be proud of me and I thank them for all of the opportunities they have provided me with also.”

By: Earl Nurse

blackhistoryeveryday:

image

Elizabeth “Bessie” Coleman was born in 1892 in Atlanta, Texas. At age 23, she moved to Chicago and became interested in the new field of aviation after hearing tales from World War I veterans. She was rejected from multiple aeronautical schools because of her race…

What we now know as Memorial Day began as “Decoration Day” in the immediate aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It was a tradition initiated by former slaves to celebrate emancipation and commemorate those who died for that cause.

These days, Memorial Day is arranged as a day “without politics”—a general patriotic celebration of all soldiers and veterans, regardless of the nature of the wars in which they participated. This is the opposite of how the day emerged, with explicitly partisan motivations, to celebrate those who fought for justice and liberation.

The concept that the population must “remember the sacrifice” of U.S. service members, without a critical reflection on the wars themselves, did not emerge by accident. It came about in the Jim Crow period as the Northern and Southern ruling classes sought to reunite the country around apolitical mourning, which required erasing the “divisive” issues of slavery and Black citizenship. These issues had been at the heart of the struggles of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

To truly honor Memorial Day means putting the politics back in. It means reviving the visions of emancipation and liberation that animated the first Decoration Days. It means celebrating those who have fought for justice, while exposing the cruel manipulation of hundreds of thousands of U.S. service members who have been sent to fight and die in wars for conquest and empire.

Ben Becker, “How Memorial Day Was Stripped Of Its African American Roots,” Dominion Of New York 5/27/13

Kochiyama’s life in social change is inspiring, both for its longevity and for her willingness to take on the most controversial causes. She is, perhaps, most famous for her association with Malcolm X, and for the photos of her holding Malcolm X in her arms as he lay dying after being gunned down in the Audubon Ballroom on February 12, 1965. But there was much, much more to Kochiyama’s activism than her sojourn with the Organization for Afro-American Unity. She fought for Puerto Rican independence, provided support for social and political prisoners, and was instrumental in the fight for reparations for Japanese American internees.

But the importance of Kochiyama’s story doesn’t end with her personal history. For while she is no doubt a remarkable person, she was not alone among Asian Americans of her generation in her commitment to social justice. Throughout her story we are reminded of others who struggled alongside her, of the the Asian American movement of the 1960s that was inspired, in part, by Japanese American internment, exclusionary and blatantly racist immigration laws, the Vietnam War, and exploitation and discrimination of Asian immigrant workers. That movement gave birth to the phrase “Asian American” as a statement of inter-ethnic solidarity, and it stood against unjust wars and with the movements for African American civil rights, workers rights, and immigrant rights, and for multiculturalism, open enrollment in colleges and universities, and diversification of university curricula. That movement gave us Asian American studies, and Asian American studies has allowed us to create a record of our history, in our own words.

Scot Nakagawa, “Yuri Kochiyama,” ChangeLab 5/20/13

blackhistoryalbum:

Young African American Girl, c. 1855. Courtesy of The Kinsey Collection

Black History Album, The Way We Were
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(via so-treu)