Racialicious

Racialicious is a blog about the intersection of race and pop culture. Check out our updates on the latest celebrity gaffes, our no-holds-barred critique of questionable media representations. If you've been on the blog, you know how this Tumblr works, too. Including the moderation policy.
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Posts tagged "documentary"

Kendra James (tyndalecode) will be livetweeting PBS’ broadcast of the documentary American Promise tonight at 10pm EST from the Racialicious Twitter account @Racialicious

Watch along and join in the discussion!

-KJ 

After watching the film I was struck by the undeniable power of testimony, the collective narrative of being unapologetically yourself and the fact that despite the unifying acronym there is not one LGBT experience. And that’s a good thing. Yet, I did feel lonely being the only trans person in the documentary, which is poignantly representative of the movement’s current focus that tends to see trans people as an afterthought, a gesture of inclusivity.

One person cannot represent anyone but themselves. The burden of representation is too heavy for one to carry. My journey isn’t reflective of all trans women, men and people’s lives (for example I say “fully transitioned” in the film, which varies for all trans people, and refer to my relationship with my body as “the wrong equipment” – some feel theirs is in fact “right”). The number of people of color featured is wonderful and so is the fabulousness of drag legend Lady Bunny (who adamantly points out drag queens’ and street people’s – let’s not forget about trans women’s – presence at the Stonewall Riots) and Twiggy Pucci Garcon (who represented the ball community and mentioned my legendary sisters there) – all of which helps diversify the portrait of race and gender.

I still find myself struck by the fact that I, this brown trans girl from Kalihi, a low-income, resilient town in Honolulu, was sharing cinematic space with groundbreakers, from Ellen DeGeneres and Wanda Sykes to Larry Kramer and Lupe Valdez. It dawned on me as I sat down in that dark theater that my life, my story, a snapshot of my existence will forever be archived as part of our movement.

A little girl growing up like I did will be able to see herself in this film. She will not have to hunt down the footage, like my dear sister Reina Gossett had to when she sought and uncovered footage of Sylvia Rivera at the 1973 Christopher Street Liberation Day Rally. This will be on HBO, not hidden in archives or blazed into the faulty memory bank of witnesses.

Personal stories are vital to culture change and I believe that this film will be pivotal to changing people’s perceptions about the LGBT community, but personal narratives are not everything. True progress occurs when we’re able to contextualize our personal experiences and come to the realization that we are part of a movement of people struggling with similar and dissimilar systemic oppressions.

As reported in Vanity Fair, the fight for marriage was a major catalyst for the creation of this project. And it’s with a note of bittersweetness that I celebrate the premiere of this film and the striking down of DOMA. The freedom to marry is important (it took decades of organizing, movement resources and millions of dollars), as I said on MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry (clip embedded below) on Saturday, but so are daily access issues that low-income, homeless, incarcerated, HIV-living, immigrant, jobless and LGBT communities of color face, which frankly are not sexy issues that make passersby feel all warm and fuzzy inside. And these issues don’t garner the same resources and media focus as marriage.

Well dear readers, I have been watching a lot of documentaries lately (the product of waiting to go back to work) so I thought I would share the one’s I have seen and my thoughts with you. However, the list alone is a multi-page word document (when I commit, I commit; Oops) so I will start with the list of African American specific documentaries and go from there:

4 Little Girls (1997)

A Man Named Pearl (2006)

A Question of Color (1992)

A. Philip Randolph: For Jobs & Freedom (1996)

African American Lives (2006)

African American Lives 2 (2008)

All of Us: Protecting Black Women Against AIDS (2009)

America Beyond the Color Line (2005)

BaadAssss Cinema: A Bold Look at 70s Blaxploitation Films (2002)

Banished (2006)

Bastards of the Party (2005)

Between Black and White (1994)

Black American Conservatism: An Exploration of Ideas (1992)

Black Is – Black Ain’t: A Personal Journey Through Black Identity (1995)

Black Like Who? (1997)

Black on Black (1968)

Blacking Up: Hip Hop’s Remix of Race and Identity (2010)

Breaking the Huddle (2008)

Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin (2002)

By River, By Rail (1998)

Chester Himes: A Rage in Harlem (2009)

Chisholm ’72: Unbought & Unbossed (2004)Citizen King (2004)

COINTELPRO: The FBI’s War on Black America (2009)

Color Adjustment (1991)

Crisis in Levittown (1957)

Dorothy Dandridge: An American Beauty (2003)

Ethnic Notions (1986)

Eyes on the Prize Series (1987)

Fannie Lou Hamer: Voting Rights Activists (2009)

Faubourg Tremé: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans (2008)

Freedom Riders (2009)

Good Hair (2009)

Goodbye Uncle Tom (1971)

Half Past Autumn: The Life and Work of Gordon Parks (2000)

Hoop Dreams (1994)

It’s a Damn Shame: Homosexuality in Hop-Hop (2006)

Jazz (2001)

Just Black?: Multi-Racial Identity (1992)

Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History (1998)

Lady Day Sings the Blues (2005)

Malcolm X: Make It Plain (1994)

Midnight Ramble: Oscar Micheaux and the Story of Race Movies (1994)

The N Word: Divided We Stand (2006)

Passin’ It On: the Black Panthers’ Search for Justice (2006)

Prom Night in Mississippi (2009)

Racism in America: Small Town 1950s Case Study

Ralph Ellison: Invisible Man, Celebrated Writer (2009)

Reconstruction: The Second Civil War (2004)

Roads to Memphis: the Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. (2010)

Scottsboro: An American Tragedy (2005)

Secret Daughter (1996)

Sisters of Selma: Bearing Witness for Change (2007)

Slavery and the Making of America (2004)

Slavery by Another Name (2012)

Soul Food Junkies (2012)

Soundtrack for a Revolution (2009)

Strange Fruit (2002)

The Abolitionists (2013)

The Black List: Volume 1 (2008)

The Black List: Volume 2 (2009)

The Black List: Volume 3

The Black Power Mixtape, 1967-1975 (2011)

The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords (1998)

The Black Wall Street

The Central Park Five (2013)

The Darker Side of Black (1996)

The Language You Cry In (1998)

The Loving Story (2011)

The Massachusetts 54th Colored Infantry (1991)

The Mirror Lied (1999)

The Murder of Emmett Till (2003)

The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow (2004)

The Two Nations of Black America (2008)

Two Dollars and A Dream (1989)

Unchained Memories: Readings From the Slave Narratives (2003)

Underground Railroad: the William Still Story (2012)

Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson (2005)

Wattstax (1973)

We Shall Overcome (1988)

When the Levies Broke (2006)

With All Deliberate Speed (2005)

(via seanpadilla)

From Shadow and Act:

The terms just isn’t what it used to be - or doesn’t mean what it was once collectively believed to mean. It’s evolving. It’s no longer *uncool* to be called a nerd. In fact, it’s a label many wear very proudly, as it’s redefined.

I recall seeing a sticker on a parked car here in NYC that read: “If being a nerd means that I’m not the dumbest muthaf*cker in the room, then I’ll definitely be a nerd." Or something like that…
 
Other terms I’ve seen/heard include: “Nerd-chic” or “Nerd-cool”… and more.
Some have joked that President Barack Obama is the idol black nerds have longed for and needed, adding that he’s the best thing for black nerds everywhere, as he’s helped make it cool to be a nerd who happens to be black.
There have even been articles on the so-called new acceptance of black nerds, or “blerds” as I’ve heard some say, like THIS one from New York Magazine, titled Revenge Of The Black Nerd.
And so on, and so forth…
So I suppose it was only a matter of time before filmmakers hoped on and rode this wave of newfound black nerdom, we could call it.
 
Here’s one, titled Carbonerdious, from director Tony G. Williams… 
queensheartsnpeacesigns:

forbrowngirls:

Bill Duke’s documentary “Dark Girls” will premiere on @oprah ‘s television network OWN in June.

fina-fucking-ly!!! Ive been waiting for like a year, June. Mark your calendars!!!

queensheartsnpeacesigns:

forbrowngirls:

Bill Duke’s documentary “Dark Girls” will premiere on @oprah ‘s television network OWN in June.

fina-fucking-ly!!! Ive been waiting for like a year, June. Mark your calendars!!!

(via newmodelminority)

Speaking of documentaries, friend of the R Dr. Mark Anthony Neal interviews Shola Lynch, the director of Free Angela Davis And Other Political Prisoners, about the flick and what documentarians face in trying to get their stories on film. 

Colorlines’ Jamilah King and Jorge Rivas run down six facts about basketball in Native American communities, including the fact that Louisville Cardinal Shoni Schimmel is the subject of the documentary Off The Rez, on her struggle to become the first person from her community to go to college on an athletic scholarship. 

blackfashion:


Check out the new compilation album featuring Alabama Shakes, Bad Brains, Childish Gambino, Gary Clark Jr,Saul Williams, Van Hunt, OXYMORRONS, The Skins, The White Mandingos, & Cerebral Ballzy presented by AFROPUNK here.
LINK: https://www.facebook.com/SMACKGuide/app_354691784589640. 

PS. you can now watch the AFROPUNK documentary that started it all just by liking AFROPUNK on facebook here.“Not your typical Black History Month documentary”

blackfashion:

Check out the new compilation album featuring Alabama Shakes, Bad Brains, Childish Gambino, Gary Clark Jr,Saul Williams, Van Hunt, OXYMORRONS, The Skins, The White Mandingos, & Cerebral Ballzy presented by AFROPUNK here.

LINK: https://www.facebook.com/SMACKGuide/app_354691784589640

PS. you can now watch the AFROPUNK documentary that started it all just by liking AFROPUNK on facebook here.
“Not your typical Black History Month documentary”

(via mylovelylifelongings-deactivate)

From the website:

Even Me confronts the overwhelming crisis of HIV/AIDS among older adults 50+. Defying the myth that HIV/AIDS is a gay or young person’s disease, this revealing documentary depicts the devastating impact of this epidemic on the heterosexual, older adult population and communities of color.

(H/t kalamu)

(**TRIGGER WARNING: Anti-Mexican racism**)

You’ve probably seen her art—or even used at a rally! Meet artist/activist Favianna Rodriguez, co-founder of Presente.org who, among other campaigns, help oust Lou Dobbs from CNN. Part 2 of her story and the larger story of migration is here, and part 3 is here