Racialicious

Racialicious is a blog about the intersection of race and pop culture. Check out our updates on the latest celebrity gaffes, our no-holds-barred critique of questionable media representations. If you've been on the blog, you know how this Tumblr works, too. Including the moderation policy.
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Posts tagged "artists of color"
womenwhokickass:

Emily Kngwarreye: Why she kicks ass
She was an Aboriginal artist from the Utopia community in the Northern Territory, Australia.
She is one of the most prominent and successful artists in the history of contemporary Indigenous Australian art.
She didn’t take up painting seriously until she was nearly 80.
Her early art was for preparing and using designs for women’s ceremonies, she then moved to painting batik cloth, then to canvas.
Her first international solo exhibition of was held in Amsterdam at the Oude Kerk in 1999 by The Aboriginal Gallery of Dreamings. 
In 2013, the first museum featuring a single Aboriginal Artist will be opened in Melbourne Australia . The Emily Museum is located at 11-15 Christensen St Cheltenham Victoria Australia . See more here.
Also in 2000, Emily’s work was amongst that of eight individual and collaborative groups of Indigenous Australian artists shown in the prestigious Nicholas Hall at the Hermitage Museum in Russia.
On 23 May 2007 her 1994 painting Earth’s Creation was purchased by Tim Jennings of Mbantua Gallery & Cultural Museum for A$1,056,000 at auction, setting a new record an Aboriginal artwork.
You can see a chronology of her and her work by clicking here.

womenwhokickass:

Emily Kngwarreye: Why she kicks ass

  • She was an Aboriginal artist from the Utopia community in the Northern Territory, Australia.
  • She is one of the most prominent and successful artists in the history of contemporary Indigenous Australian art.
  • She didn’t take up painting seriously until she was nearly 80.
  • Her early art was for preparing and using designs for women’s ceremonies, she then moved to painting batik cloth, then to canvas.
  • Her first international solo exhibition of was held in Amsterdam at the Oude Kerk in 1999 by The Aboriginal Gallery of Dreamings. 
  • In 2013, the first museum featuring a single Aboriginal Artist will be opened in Melbourne Australia . The Emily Museum is located at 11-15 Christensen St Cheltenham Victoria Australia . See more here.
  • Also in 2000, Emily’s work was amongst that of eight individual and collaborative groups of Indigenous Australian artists shown in the prestigious Nicholas Hall at the Hermitage Museum in Russia.
  • On 23 May 2007 her 1994 painting Earth’s Creation was purchased by Tim Jennings of Mbantua Gallery & Cultural Museum for A$1,056,000 at auction, setting a new record an Aboriginal artwork.
  • You can see a chronology of her and her work by clicking here.

(via nitanahkohe)

One of my friends thoughtfully shared a link with me about Kickstarter’s impact on indie artists: “Kickstarter Expects To Provide More Funding To The Arts Than NEA.” To which I squealed, “NEA funding is a pretty low bar!” Not to disdain the valuable work of the National Endowment for the Arts, but their impact on individual artists is negligible, and on individual artists of color…minimal. To assume otherwise is to misunderstand the role of the NEA.The NEA funds organizations, not artists. People create art, teach kids, and perform. Institutions showcase these artists, give them space to grow, and a platform to share their vision of the world. But institutions are gatekeepers and serve the interests of structural inequity.

fTo get funding, artists of color had to form organizations and partner with [older, whiter] nonprofits. Spellman pinpointed the detrimental effect: “a part of the trap is that you aspire to institutionalize yourself.”And shockingly, artists of color weren’t as good at institutionalizing themselves. As funding guidelines required that grants be readministered through white-majority institutions, culturally specific organizations did not have the support to build stable infrastructures of their own. Which led us tothe “only one Ailey” phenomenon: while people of color make most of the art in this country, we only have a handful of powerhouse, internationally recognized arts organizations. There are a ton of brilliant artists and arts organizations of color scraping by, but our cultures deserve much more.

Which brings us back to the crowdsourcing explosion. Things we can be sure of: the funding model for the arts privileges older, larger arts institutions, which have historically excluded artists of color…[c]rowdsourcing platforms such as Kickstarter cut through all this mess. As cultural consumers, we can vote with our wallets. And cultural entrepreneurs that look and act like us can finally move their projects forward.

Love love love Tiffany Bradley’s bracing call-to-arms post on the best way to help out artists of color on the R today.