Racialicious

Racialicious is a blog about the intersection of race and pop culture. Check out our updates on the latest celebrity gaffes, our no-holds-barred critique of questionable media representations. If you've been on the blog, you know how this Tumblr works, too. Including the moderation policy.
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Posts tagged "Jan Brewer"

2) White privilege conditions white people not to see white rage. However, it makes them hyper-aware of Black threat. Newt Gingrich is white rage personified. And for it, he gets loads of applause. So is Jan Brewer, but usually we think of white rage in masculine terms. Gender stereotypes condition us not to see white women as being capable of this kind of dangerous emotional output. We reserve our notions of female anger for Black women. Such hidden race-gender logics allow Brewer to assert that she “felt threatened,” even though she was trying to handle the situation “with grace.” Now look back at the picture: who is threatening whom? Couple white rage with white women’s access to the protections that have been afforded to their gender, and you have something that looks ironically like white female privilege. Yes (yes, yes), the discourse of protection is based upon problematic and sexist stereotypes of white women as dainty and unable to care for themselves, and yes, these stereotypes have caused white women to be oppressed by white men. But remember, gender does not exist in a racial vacuum. It is performed in highly racialized contexts, and history proves that what constitutes oppression for white women in relation to white men, dually constitutes privilege for white women in relation to Black men. (I’m not spoiling for a fight today, so anybody who feels uncomfortable with such assertions should probably go read some Patricia Hill Collins, Black Sexual Politics and then try again.) What I know is this: 100 years ago (less than, actually) a Black man even standing that close to a white woman would’ve gotten him lynched. (Seriously, I just discovered that even accommodationist Booker T. Washington was beaten in New York in 1911 for talking to a white woman.) And I know that if a Black woman had wagged her finger at Bush II or even Bill Clinton, we would have seen her faced down, handcuffed, with Secret Service swarming. When your race and gender grant you opportunities to be treated with dignities that others don’t have or conversely, to heap indignities on those people, that is what we call privilege. Deal with it.


3) Unchecked white rage has always been dangerous for Brown and Black folk in America. Jan Brewer’s Arizona is not safe for Brown people and by implication, not safe for Black people (Presidents included). Not only has she terrorized and racially profiled immigrant communities, but she has gutted one of the model Ethnic Studies programs for high school students in this country. If there were ever a time for Black and Brown solidarity, it is now. And hell, lest we forget, Arizona is not even safe for white women. It is the vitriolic racial climate that Brewer’s anti-immigrant, anti-Latino policies have helped to foment that led to the violence against Gabby Giffords.

(Reblogged via so-treu and counterftnoire)

The least that any governor owes any president is respect.
It’s more than that. The least any PERSON owes any other person is respect.
Imagine what Republicans would have said if what occured at the Mesa airport between Gov. Jan Brewer and President Barack Obama had taken place between Gov. Janet Napolitano and President George W. Bush. 
Can you imagine the explosions of rhetoric from our U.S. Senators and our Republicans in the House if there was a photograph of Napolitano wagging a finger at Bush?
The condemnation would have been overwhelming.
And justified.
The governor wasn’t at the airport greeting the president on behalf of herself. She was there representing ALL of us. Right, left and middle. Young and old. Men and women.
A simple “Welcome to Arizona, let me know if there’s anything we can do for you,” would have sufficed.
A lecture, an argument, a confrontation of any kind shows disrespect for the office. Not just for the person who holds it.
The governor should be embarrassed. 
We all might have different views on politics. But we know good manners, and bad ones, when we see them.
Arizona Republic columnist EJ MONTINI, regarding governor Jan Brewer’s disgraceful, impolitic behavior to the President yesterday.

(via inothernews)
Yep.
Gottdambit THIS. 
I’m happy this newspaper is taking their governor to task.
She owes not just President Obama a personal apology,  but she owes the White House an apology and the People of Arizona one as well, for embarrassing them like that.
(via str8nochaser)
If I may? 
This is a prime example of white female privilege melded with age, namely some white women in their middle years and older who think they are entitled to speak to just about any grown person of color who is younger than they are as if the PoC is the help or, if those white women are feeling more magnanimous, their ward—regardless of the position the PoC holds…or the white woman holds, for that matter.
What Jan Brewer is exhibiting absolutely lacks hometraining…and is par of her continuing course of confusing her “racist duty” with her actual job duty. 
ETA: Oh, now she’s claiming that the POTUS “threatened” her as an explanation for her action in this photo. In other words, she’s getting all into her “white lady tears” to derail from the fact that she’s acting disrespectfully in this picture. 
And I’m getting all into my eyeroll at this.

(Reblogged via so-treu and counterftnoire)

The least that any governor owes any president is respect.

It’s more than that. The least any PERSON owes any other person is respect.

Imagine what Republicans would have said if what occured at the Mesa airport between Gov. Jan Brewer and President Barack Obama had taken place between Gov. Janet Napolitano and President George W. Bush. 

Can you imagine the explosions of rhetoric from our U.S. Senators and our Republicans in the House if there was a photograph of Napolitano wagging a finger at Bush?

The condemnation would have been overwhelming.

And justified.

The governor wasn’t at the airport greeting the president on behalf of herself. She was there representing ALL of us. Right, left and middle. Young and old. Men and women.

A simple “Welcome to Arizona, let me know if there’s anything we can do for you,” would have sufficed.

A lecture, an argument, a confrontation of any kind shows disrespect for the office. Not just for the person who holds it.

The governor should be embarrassed. 

We all might have different views on politics. But we know good manners, and bad ones, when we see them.


Arizona Republic columnist EJ MONTINI
, regarding governor Jan Brewer’s disgraceful, impolitic behavior to the President yesterday.

(via inothernews)

Yep.

Gottdambit THIS. 

I’m happy this newspaper is taking their governor to task.

She owes not just President Obama a personal apology,  but she owes the White House an apology and the People of Arizona one as well, for embarrassing them like that.

(via str8nochaser)

If I may? 

This is a prime example of white female privilege melded with age, namely some white women in their middle years and older who think they are entitled to speak to just about any grown person of color who is younger than they are as if the PoC is the help or, if those white women are feeling more magnanimous, their ward—regardless of the position the PoC holds…or the white woman holds, for that matter.

What Jan Brewer is exhibiting absolutely lacks hometraining…and is par of her continuing course of confusing her “racist duty” with her actual job duty.

ETA: Oh, now she’s claiming that the POTUS “threatened” her as an explanation for her action in this photo. In other words, she’s getting all into her “white lady tears” to derail from the fact that she’s acting disrespectfully in this picture.

And I’m getting all into my eyeroll at this.