Racialicious

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Posts tagged "Indigenous women"
womenwhokickass:

Waziyatawin: Why she kicks ass
She is a Dakota writer, teacher, and activist from the Pezihutazizi Otunwe (Yellow Medicine Village) in southwestern Minnesota.
She is a Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples in the Indigenous Governance Program at the University of Victoria, and is recognized as a leading indigenous intellectual.
 Her research interests include indigenous women’s roles in resisting colonialism, recovering indigenous knowledge, and truth-telling as part of restorative justice.
She is also the founder and council member of Oyate Nipi Kte, a non-profit organization dedicated to the recovery of Dakota traditional knowledge, sustainable ways of being, and Dakota liberation (www.oyatenipikte.org).
After receiving her Ph.D. in American history from Cornell University in 2000, she earned tenure and an associate professorship in the history department at Arizona State University where she taught for seven years. She currently holds the Indigenous Peoples Research Chair in the Indigenous Governance Program at the University of Victoria in British Columbia.
She is the author, editor, or co-editor of six volumes including: Remember This!: Dakota Decolonization and the Eli Taylor Narratives (University of Nebraska Press 2005); Indigenizing the Academy: Transforming Scholarship and Empowering Communities(University of Nebraska Press 2004); For Indigenous Eyes Only: A Decolonization Handbook(School of Advanced Research Press 2005); In the Footsteps of Our Ancestors: The Dakota Commemorative Marches of the 21st Century (Living Justice Press 2006); What Does Justice Look Like? The Struggle for Liberation in Dakota Homeland (Living Justice Press 2008); and, her most recent volume, For Indigenous Minds Only: A Decolonization Handbook (School of Advanced Research Press, 2012).
As an activist, Waziyatawin gained public attention in 2007 when she was arrested multiple times while protesting the Minnesota sesquicentennial celebration. The protests aimed to raise awareness of broken treaties and colonial violence, including the hanging of 38 Dakota men during the Dakota War of 1862 (the largest mass execution in American history).
In 2011, she travelled to Palestine with a group of indigenous and women of colour scholars and artists including Angela Davis, Chandra Talpade Mohanty, and Ayoka Chenzira. Afterwards the group published a statement endorsing the boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) movement. She has drawn connections between the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and colonialism in North America.

womenwhokickass:

Waziyatawin: Why she kicks ass

  • She is a Dakota writer, teacher, and activist from the Pezihutazizi Otunwe (Yellow Medicine Village) in southwestern Minnesota.
  • She is a Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples in the Indigenous Governance Program at the University of Victoriaand is recognized as a leading indigenous intellectual.
  •  Her research interests include indigenous women’s roles in resisting colonialism, recovering indigenous knowledge, and truth-telling as part of restorative justice.
  • She is also the founder and council member of Oyate Nipi Kte, a non-profit organization dedicated to the recovery of Dakota traditional knowledge, sustainable ways of being, and Dakota liberation (www.oyatenipikte.org).
  • After receiving her Ph.D. in American history from Cornell University in 2000, she earned tenure and an associate professorship in the history department at Arizona State University where she taught for seven years. She currently holds the Indigenous Peoples Research Chair in the Indigenous Governance Program at the University of Victoria in British Columbia.
  • She is the author, editor, or co-editor of six volumes including: Remember This!: Dakota Decolonization and the Eli Taylor Narratives (University of Nebraska Press 2005); Indigenizing the Academy: Transforming Scholarship and Empowering Communities(University of Nebraska Press 2004); For Indigenous Eyes Only: A Decolonization Handbook(School of Advanced Research Press 2005); In the Footsteps of Our Ancestors: The Dakota Commemorative Marches of the 21st Century (Living Justice Press 2006); What Does Justice Look Like? The Struggle for Liberation in Dakota Homeland (Living Justice Press 2008); and, her most recent volume, For Indigenous Minds Only: A Decolonization Handbook (School of Advanced Research Press, 2012).
  • As an activist, Waziyatawin gained public attention in 2007 when she was arrested multiple times while protesting the Minnesota sesquicentennial celebration. The protests aimed to raise awareness of broken treaties and colonial violence, including the hanging of 38 Dakota men during the Dakota War of 1862 (the largest mass execution in American history).
  • In 2011, she travelled to Palestine with a group of indigenous and women of colour scholars and artists including Angela DavisChandra Talpade Mohanty, and Ayoka Chenzira. Afterwards the group published a statement endorsing the boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) movement. She has drawn connections between the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and colonialism in North America.

(via nitanahkohe)

Lately, Native people have taken to the streets malls in demonstrations of Public Indian-ness (“PI”) that surpasses the sheer volume of activism of even Alcatraz and the Longest Walk. There’s a heapum big amount of PI going on right now! Many people, non-Native and Native alike, are wondering what the heck is going with their local Native population and how this so-called #IdleNoMore Movement managed to get the usually muffled Natives restless enough to be Indian in public. I mean, like Chris Rock said, he hasn’t ever even met two Indians at the same time. He’s seen “polar bears riding a tricycle” but he’s “never seen an Indian family just chillin’ out at Red Lobster.”

Now, people can’t seem to get away from us.

And that’s cool, but isn’t that what pow-wows and November is for? People (non-Native and Native alike) can only take so much PI, right? Is that what the Idle No More movement is? An extended Native American Heritage Month, where non-Natives have to act like they’re fascinated by Native culture?

In a word, no. It is much more. Please consider this a fairly exhaustive explanation of the Movement, what it is not and what it is. If for some reason you cannot read the next 1000 or so brilliant words, I can be summed up thusly: Idle No More is not new. Instead, it is the latest incarnation of the sustained Indigenous Resistance to the rape, pillage, and exploitation of this continent and its women that has existed since 1492. It is not the Occupy Movement, although there are some similarities. It is not only about Canada and it is not only about Native people.

Finally, and probably most importantly, it (and we) are not going away anytime soon. So get used to it (and us).

Racialicious guest contributor Gyasi Ross gives a great summary about the #IdleNoMore Movement, especially for those who want to compare it to Occupy Wall Street. 
womenwhokickass:

Monica Chuji: Why she kicks ass
She is Kichwa from the Sarayaku, Sucumbios province, in the Amazon basin, and a leading figure in the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador (CONAIE). 
She was appointed communications minister by Correa, and became his public spokesperson. But when Correa sent army troops to put down a protest against oil drilling in the village of Dayuma (Orellana province) in December 2007, Chuji protested, called for an investigation, and finally resigned. Her resignation letter decried the government’s “criminalization” of social movements. 
She joined the 2008 constitutional assembly for the ruling party, Alianza Pais, and sat on the commission for Natural Resources and Biodiversity throughout the tense negotiations on water, oil and mining. Chuji left the Alianza Pais as soon as the assembly finished its work—with others following her lead.
The Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador (CONAIE) and other groups criticize Correa’s support for large-scale mining and development megaprojects. Social movements unsuccessfully pushed for the inclusion of constitutional provisions that would recognize communities’ right to “prior consent” before mining or oil exploitation projects take place on their land. Another pressing issue is the Manta-Manaus project, which would build a multimodal transportation infrastructure between the Ecuadorian and Brazilian coasts, causing massive destruction to the Amazon rainforest. Indigenous Assembly Members also clashed with Correa’s allies over a proposal to make Kichwa Ecuador’s second official language. The dispute was settled by a compromise making Kichwa “an official language of intercultural relation” along with Shuar, the implications of which are unclear.
At the International Service for Human Rights’s seminar entitled “Traditional Values and Human Rights” she outlined the concept of ‘sumak kawsay’ (or living in harmony and living fully), a worldview of indigenous Bolivian and Ecuadorian peoples, related to human rights. She said the cultural values of these indigenous peoples were based on principles of dignity and equality, and recognition that people are part of nature. Integral to this value system is the display of respect towards all individuals and a deep connection to nature. She stressed the importance of these traditional values being extended to all areas of life, including the philosophical, ethical, spiritual and economic dimensions.
She was also the Foundation President Communication, Education and Rights of “Tukui Shimi” (All Voices) the Human Rights Consultant, collective rights and multiculturalism of OHCHR-UNDP-UN Ecuador, Dirigenta Federation of Organizations of the Kichwa Nationality of Sucumbíos-FONAKISE, Andean Project Trainer Promotion of Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples and Afro Descendants, OHCHR and UNDP., Coordinator “Kichwa Women Training with Emphasis on Human Rights and Advisor on Human Rights and International Relations of the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador, CONAIE.
She was found guilty of spreading libel about Minister Vinicio Alvarado in an interview published in the newspaperEl Comercio; Chuji was sentenced to one year in prison and a $100,000 fine; Chuji’s appeal is still being considered. However, after the sentence was imposed by the court at Pichincha penitentiary, Alvarado exercised his prerogative to pardon Chuji on 28 November. She however, rejected his “forgiveness”.

womenwhokickass:

Monica Chuji: Why she kicks ass

  • She is Kichwa from the Sarayaku, Sucumbios province, in the Amazon basin, and a leading figure in the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador (CONAIE). 
  • She was appointed communications minister by Correa, and became his public spokesperson. But when Correa sent army troops to put down a protest against oil drilling in the village of Dayuma (Orellana province) in December 2007, Chuji protested, called for an investigation, and finally resigned. Her resignation letter decried the government’s “criminalization” of social movements. 
  • She joined the 2008 constitutional assembly for the ruling party, Alianza Pais, and sat on the commission for Natural Resources and Biodiversity throughout the tense negotiations on water, oil and mining. Chuji left the Alianza Pais as soon as the assembly finished its work—with others following her lead.
  • The Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador (CONAIE) and other groups criticize Correa’s support for large-scale mining and development megaprojects. Social movements unsuccessfully pushed for the inclusion of constitutional provisions that would recognize communities’ right to “prior consent” before mining or oil exploitation projects take place on their land. Another pressing issue is the Manta-Manaus project, which would build a multimodal transportation infrastructure between the Ecuadorian and Brazilian coasts, causing massive destruction to the Amazon rainforest. Indigenous Assembly Members also clashed with Correa’s allies over a proposal to make Kichwa Ecuador’s second official language. The dispute was settled by a compromise making Kichwa “an official language of intercultural relation” along with Shuar, the implications of which are unclear.
  • At the International Service for Human Rights’s seminar entitled “Traditional Values and Human Rights” she outlined the concept of ‘sumak kawsay’ (or living in harmony and living fully), a worldview of indigenous Bolivian and Ecuadorian peoples, related to human rights. She said the cultural values of these indigenous peoples were based on principles of dignity and equality, and recognition that people are part of nature. Integral to this value system is the display of respect towards all individuals and a deep connection to nature. She stressed the importance of these traditional values being extended to all areas of life, including the philosophical, ethical, spiritual and economic dimensions.
  • She was also the Foundation President Communication, Education and Rights of “Tukui Shimi” (All Voices) the Human Rights Consultant, collective rights and multiculturalism of OHCHR-UNDP-UN Ecuador, Dirigenta Federation of Organizations of the Kichwa Nationality of Sucumbíos-FONAKISE, Andean Project Trainer Promotion of Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples and Afro Descendants, OHCHR and UNDP., Coordinator “Kichwa Women Training with Emphasis on Human Rights and Advisor on Human Rights and International Relations of the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador, CONAIE.
  • She was found guilty of spreading libel about Minister Vinicio Alvarado in an interview published in the newspaperEl Comercio; Chuji was sentenced to one year in prison and a $100,000 fine; Chuji’s appeal is still being considered. However, after the sentence was imposed by the court at Pichincha penitentiary, Alvarado exercised his prerogative to pardon Chuji on 28 November. She however, rejected his “forgiveness”.

(via mylovelylifelongings-deactivate)

On December 14, Two-Spirit leaders from 12 different states called upon the two principle negotiators of the reauthorization the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), Vice-President Biden and Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Virginia), to include Native women. This action was taken in light of news reports that Cantor was supportive of this bill as along as one key provision was removed: the protection for Native American women.

The Two-Spirit leadership asked for tribal criminal jurisdiction over non-Indian offenders who commit acts of domestic violence or violate protection orders against our Native women; clarifying tribal civil authority to issue and enforce protection orders regardless of the nationality, race or sex of the offender; and for Federal criminal offenses to be made consistent with model domestic violence laws.

Within hours of sending their letter, Lynn Rosenthal, a White House Advisor to Vice-President Biden, responded, “The Vice President is working hard to get an agreement on VAWA that includes criminal jurisdiction and protects all victims.”

Later that day, the same group of Two-Spirit leaders called on the members of congressional Black, Hispanic, Asian Pacific American, Native American, and Progressive Caucuses to stand with our Native women.

Native women experience domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking at crisis levels.

According to United States Justice Department, rates of domestic violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women are among the highest in the United States when compared to other ethnicities. Nearly half of all Native American women—46 percent—have experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner. One in three Indian women will, at some point in her life, experience the violence and trauma of rape.

On some reservations Native American women are murdered at a rate more than 10 times the national average.

“We must do everything in our power to protect our Native women; enabling them to feel safe and for them to hold their heads high as valued, proud and strong Native women,” said Harlan Pruden of the NorthEast Two-Spirit Society.

nitanahkohe:

Product(RES), Sonny Assu (We Wai Kai)

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) would like to call on the international community to participate in the 7th annual Sisters In Spirit Vigils on October 4th 2012 by hosting a moment of silence to honour the lives of Missing and Murdered Aboriginal women in Canada.

Sisters In Spirit Vigils are a movement for social change. October 4th is day where we honour the lives of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls and support families who have been tragically touched by the loss of a loved one.
In Canada on October 4th, tens of thousands of concerned citizens will be attending vigils from coast-to coast-to coast. Vigils take many forms, from a rally, to a candle-light vigil, to a workshop, to a moment of silence.
We invite the international community, to stand with us on October 4th, not only to remember our loved ones and support families but to also remember that violence impacts all Indigenous women globally.
“In this era of increased recognition of Indigenous rights outlined in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Native Women’s Association of Canada is calling for unity,” declares NWAC President Jeanette Corbiere Lavell. “By taking the time out of our busy lives to mark October 4th and gather together,” she adds, “we can call on all levels of government to be accountable for the promises they make to Indigenous peoples.”
Please visit us online for up-to-date information on the Sisters In Spirit Vigil movement. Registration forms for registering a moment of silence on October 4th are also available at http://www.nwac.ca/programs/2012-vigil-registration. For additional registration information contact: Jennifer Rankin, jrankin@nwac.ca Tel: 613-722-3033 x 234 Toll free: 1-800-461-4043
Fax: 613-722-7687

(via nishnabin)

urbannativegirl:

Excitement is building for Jeff Barnaby’s ‘Rhymes for Young Ghouls’ feature film starring Young Mohawk Actress Kawennáhere Devery Jacobs. Read about it here

urbannativegirl:

Ojibway boxer Mary Spencer is one to watch! Not only is she a successful athlete, she also works with youth. What’s not to love? Check out the full post here. 

“When I talk to kids, the main thing I like to share is: Whatever your dream is, even if it seems wild and crazy, pursue it” Mary Spencer

girljanitor:

Sunny Clifford, a 26-year-old Pine Ridge Tribal park ranger, has launched a Change.org petition that seeks to improve the quality of women’s lives by making Plan B available—and affordable—throughout Indian Country. Just months after the Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center (NAWHERC) published a startling February 2012 report, “Indigenous Women’s Dialogue: Roundtable Report on the Accessibility of Plan B as an Over the Counter (OTC) Within Indian Health Service,” Clifford’s petition is over 100,000 signatures strong and well on its way to meeting its goal of 150,000 signatures. But with just three voting days left, Clifford’s campaign greatly needs your support.

(via nishnabin)