Racialicious

Racialicious is a blog about the intersection of race and pop culture. Check out our updates on the latest celebrity gaffes, our no-holds-barred critique of questionable media representations. If you've been on the blog, you know how this Tumblr works, too. Including the moderation policy.
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Posts tagged "Australia"

theteratophile:

So apparently cultural appropriation only matters if it’s an American culture! Good to know!

Seriously, I see people getting up in arms over white girls in war bonnets - and that’s fine, that’s as it should be. I see people getting up in arms over people portraying Ratonhnhaké:ton with a warbonnet when he’s Mohawk, not Plains, and that’s fine and as it should be too.

But nobody cares that they put Aboriginal Australian trappings onto a European animal? Specifically a European animal that was introduced here, became feral, and destroyed a huge portion of the ecosystem Aboriginal Australians depended on to survive?

No one?

darklovelyandsouthasian:

Heya! I’m Tiara, Bangladeshi parentage and Malaysian origin, currently based in SF Bay Area in the US. I grew up in a climate of intense racism against Bangladeshis in Malaysia and people would find every excuse to find fault with Bangladeshis. Skin colour was a common thing: I was dark, therefore I was ugly, therefore I could not be trusted. Sometimes I’d be called “hitam manis” (sweet black), but it took on a vibe closer to a slur, and usually people just skipped straight to the more potent slurs - “Bangla” or “keling” (a slur directed towards dark-skinned South Asians, about as bad as n*****).
Shadeism is rife in Malaysia, and overtly so. Every beauty product has skin lightening properties (I don’t know if any of them worked). Dark meant evil, dirty, uncouth, untrustworthy, low class, disgusting. I worked in the media for a while but could never get an onscreen role because again, too dark.
I moved to Australia in 2006 and it was interesting to note that in some ways the skin colour pressure is less overt. If anything my skin colour gets exotified - “oh I wish I could tan like you!” or comparison to various sweets. But it’s still hard to get taken seriously while brown - people ask me constantly “where are you from?” as if I am some space alien and then they dispute my answer! They are surprised I speak English! (I did get an onscreen TV role surprisingly, yay Australia Network). I’ve been doing burlesque for a while and I do get quite a few people sayjng I’m too brown hairy fat ugly to bare myself. Screw them.
The picture is in response to a Brisbane based lingerie company that hosted a photo competition & model search. Amongst their criteria was that the model should be a “classic beauty” and specifically mentioned pale white skin. It took them a while to realize how racist their criteria was, but even now there are no brown models.
Submitted by Creatrix Tiara

Reblogging, not only because we <3 Creatrix Tiara at the R, but also because her photo’s message is so fucking right on!

darklovelyandsouthasian:

Heya! I’m Tiara, Bangladeshi parentage and Malaysian origin, currently based in SF Bay Area in the US. I grew up in a climate of intense racism against Bangladeshis in Malaysia and people would find every excuse to find fault with Bangladeshis. Skin colour was a common thing: I was dark, therefore I was ugly, therefore I could not be trusted. Sometimes I’d be called “hitam manis” (sweet black), but it took on a vibe closer to a slur, and usually people just skipped straight to the more potent slurs - “Bangla” or “keling” (a slur directed towards dark-skinned South Asians, about as bad as n*****).

Shadeism is rife in Malaysia, and overtly so. Every beauty product has skin lightening properties (I don’t know if any of them worked). Dark meant evil, dirty, uncouth, untrustworthy, low class, disgusting. I worked in the media for a while but could never get an onscreen role because again, too dark.

I moved to Australia in 2006 and it was interesting to note that in some ways the skin colour pressure is less overt. If anything my skin colour gets exotified - “oh I wish I could tan like you!” or comparison to various sweets. But it’s still hard to get taken seriously while brown - people ask me constantly “where are you from?” as if I am some space alien and then they dispute my answer! They are surprised I speak English! (I did get an onscreen TV role surprisingly, yay Australia Network). I’ve been doing burlesque for a while and I do get quite a few people sayjng I’m too brown hairy fat ugly to bare myself. Screw them.

The picture is in response to a Brisbane based lingerie company that hosted a photo competition & model search. Amongst their criteria was that the model should be a “classic beauty” and specifically mentioned pale white skin. It took them a while to realize how racist their criteria was, but even now there are no brown models.

Submitted by Creatrix Tiara

Reblogging, not only because we <3 Creatrix Tiara at the R, but also because her photo’s message is so fucking right on!

(via colouredcollective)

indiancountry:

Light heavyweight fighter Damien Hooper, Aborigine from Australia, made waves this week when he entered the Olympic boxing ring in London wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with the Aboriginal flag before a bout. The move was a violation of International Olympic Committee (IOC) rules, which forbids the displaying of flags that don’t represent competing nations. Political statements are also forbidden, although sometimes tolerated if cleared beforehand. He could have been disqualified for his act of civil disobedience.

Instead, Hooper got a warning and a reprimand from Australian Olympic chef de mission Nick Green, who told reporters that the boxer was “was extremely apologetic. He has confirmed with me that it was a ‘one-off’ and that he won’t do it again.” However, A spokesman for the Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) said the committee had informed Olympic organizers. He said Hooper could face disciplinary action.

A spokesman for the IOC has confirmed to the U.K.’s Independent newspaper, however, they would not seek to punish Hooper, who in 2010 became the first indigenous Australian to win a junior world title.

Aboriginal Boxer Will Not Be Punished for Wearing Native Flag at Olympics, Receives Support From Across the Globe - ICTMN.com)

A new magazine hopes to reach gay men in Asian communities - both in Australia and abroad - in a fight against cultural stereotypes and sexual hierarchy.

The magazine’s editor and some contributors told SBS about their vision for the groundbreaking publication, in an environment rife with racism and misconceptions.

The editor of A-Men, Min Fuh Teh, says it’s important that it exist online, so that Asian men who are not yet ‘out’ can still access it without the risk of their families ever finding a hard copy in their posession.

Comments discriminating against Asian men for their physical attributes - stature, ‘slanty’ eyes and more - were common on websites frequented by gay men, Mr Fuh Teh said.

He hoped the magazine would help raise awareness in the gay community that those remarks are hurtful and unacceptable.

Amy Chien-Yu Wang, “Gay Asians Fight Stereotypes,” World News Australia, 2/29/12 (with video, without video transcript)