Racialicious

Apr 17

msjwilly:

There’s a change.org petition going around that is asking for Comedy Central to give me my own spot after The Daily Show! People keep bringing it up to me and it’s like, a strange thing to ignore (for the sole purpose of being politically correct). SO I want to like, take a moment and say thank you to those that created it and signed it. That is unbelievably nice of you. And I am so very very honored to like, even be a person that some people would consider a candidate to slip into that 11:30 spot. (sounds like sex!)

That being said, I’m sure Comedy Central already has something dope in the works to take that particular spot (teehee sex again!) after the Daily Show. I’m sure it will be great and funny and wonderful! I can’t wait to see what it is.

BUT whatever happens with that slot, just know that I appreciate your support. Also know that right now I am in the middle of creating and working on some VERY dope things. Not necessarily the exact way that you lovelies have envisioned it, maybe something, dare I say it- ESPECIALLY & MAGNIFICENTLY DOPER. Y’all shall see soon, ya hear?!

One Million Namastes,

Jessica  Williams

(via popculturebrain)

Apr 14

A History Of Vanessa Hudgens At Coachella -

tyndalecode:

Buzzfeed calls out Vanessa Hudgens’ Cochella headdress right before praising her for dressing like a “gypsy”. I am finding this to be the best kind of racist irony.

I can’t recall another period with such a wide-ranging mainstream presence as this Carefree Black Girl archetype. You may recognize it as Willow Smith rocking a pink Mohawk, Corinne Bailey Rae sauntering around Paris, Janelle Monáe serving android realness, and 100% of Solange Knowles’ life on Instagram.

I don’t know if any of these ladies would identify as such, but their influence is deeply felt and appreciated in CFBG spaces. They exhibit the qualities we all cherish to a wider audience that isn’t regularly exposed to the multitudes of black female creativity.


While the visual presence of Carefree Black Girls is exciting, some might wonder what would prompt such a hyper-specific expression. By putting the word “carefree” front and center, it’s making a statement that we don’t want to be solely defined by hardships and stereotypes so we can enjoy our lives as we please. Carefree should not be mistaken with careless. This particular audience is equally exposed to content exploring identity, culture, and history and its implications on them. There’s a clear reverence for the difficulties they might face but an equal focus on embracing the qualities that make them unique and beautiful. The idea also embodies not letting an outside gaze rule the way you express yourself.

Overall, I think Carefree Black Girl is a lovely and much-needed step in the right direction when it comes to exploring black identities. There may be concern that it lends itself to a passing trend or restrictive roles, but fear not. The absolute worst case scenario is that girls might start wearing floral headbands and feeling great about themselves. And, that sounds like a pretty magical prospect, if you ask me.

” —

Who Exactly Is “The Carefree Black Girl”?

By Jamala Johns 

(via loveisthenewpunk)

(Source: refinery29.com, via ethiopienne)

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Apr 13

hybridchic:

INTERVIEW: THE STUDIO MUSEUM HARLEM
STORY BY TANEKEYA WORD
The artistic cultural production and cultural theory that is Afrofuturism has long used the fantastical and Science Fiction elements of robotics and aliens, to solve the inequality of colonialism by transcending the social limitations of Black Diasporic life in Western society. Although appearing cosmically perfect,  it cannot be denied that Afrofuturism’s history is far from utopic: the trauma of the African transatlantic slave trade, W.E.B Du Bois’ emphatic theory of double-consciousness, Zora Neale Hurston’s iconic folklore depicting humor amidst trauma, Sun Ra’s militant blaxploitation music and imagery, Octavia Butler’s equivocal writings on outsider aesthetics, and lets not forget thesouthernplayalisticcadillacfunkymusic of OutKast. Resilient, AfroFuturists have owned, analyzed, deconstructed, and re-coded their joy and pain, and those of their ancestors, to re-imagine the African Diasporian future—free  from Western social stigmas.
For decades, Afrofuturism was publicly linked to literature and music; and yet recently, a courtship has begun with fine art. On November 14th The Studio Museum in Harlem took the helm and debuted its Afrofuturist exhibition, “The Shadows Took Shape.” We at Saint Heron are no strangers to Afrofuturism as emerging and Saint Heron featured artists, Kelela, BCKingdom, Sampha, have strains of Afrofuturist aesthetics coded within their work, so it was a pleasure to speak with the curators, Naima J. Smith and Zoe Whitley, on Afrofuturist activism, the theme of flight throughout African American history, and accidental Afrofuturists. Set amidst the backdrop of a sensitive and rich history, like a griot “The Shadows Took Shape“ exhibition and the Saint Heron interview navigates through rough terrain to tell an ever-evolving  story of a new Black frontier.
READ THE FULL INTERVIEW AT SAINTHERON.COM
Photo: Robert Pruitt, “Untitled 3″

hybridchic:

INTERVIEW: THE STUDIO MUSEUM HARLEM

STORY BY TANEKEYA WORD

The artistic cultural production and cultural theory that is Afrofuturism has long used the fantastical and Science Fiction elements of robotics and aliens, to solve the inequality of colonialism by transcending the social limitations of Black Diasporic life in Western society. Although appearing cosmically perfect,  it cannot be denied that Afrofuturism’s history is far from utopic: the trauma of the African transatlantic slave trade, W.E.B Du Bois’ emphatic theory of double-consciousness, Zora Neale Hurston’s iconic folklore depicting humor amidst trauma, Sun Ra’s militant blaxploitation music and imagery, Octavia Butler’s equivocal writings on outsider aesthetics, and lets not forget thesouthernplayalisticcadillacfunkymusic of OutKast. Resilient, AfroFuturists have owned, analyzed, deconstructed, and re-coded their joy and pain, and those of their ancestors, to re-imagine the African Diasporian future—free  from Western social stigmas.

For decades, Afrofuturism was publicly linked to literature and music; and yet recently, a courtship has begun with fine art. On November 14th The Studio Museum in Harlem took the helm and debuted its Afrofuturist exhibition, “The Shadows Took Shape.” We at Saint Heron are no strangers to Afrofuturism as emerging and Saint Heron featured artists, Kelela, BCKingdom, Sampha, have strains of Afrofuturist aesthetics coded within their work, so it was a pleasure to speak with the curators, Naima J. Smith and Zoe Whitley, on Afrofuturist activism, the theme of flight throughout African American history, and accidental Afrofuturists. Set amidst the backdrop of a sensitive and rich history, like a griot “The Shadows Took Shape exhibition and the Saint Heron interview navigates through rough terrain to tell an ever-evolving  story of a new Black frontier.

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW AT SAINTHERON.COM

Photo: Robert Pruitt, “Untitled 3″

(via poc-creators)

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Apr 10

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'Star Wars: Episode VII' Speculation Centers on Unknown Actress Maisie Richardson-Sellers | THR -

(Source: popculturebrain, via tyndalecode)

Apr 07

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