Racialicious

Oct 21

anotherafrica:

Wangechi Mutu Takes On Transmutation As a New Form of Existentialism
On the eve of Wangechi Mutu’s solo show, ‘Nguva na Nyoka’ (Sirens and Serpents) opening this October 14 2014 at London’s Victoria Miro gallery, the artist shared candid thoughts and insights on her latest body of work with Another Africa’s Joyce Bidouzo-Coudray much like what inspired her to delve into Kenya’s rich folkloric mythologies:
"The fact that women have this option to turn into these myths, these powerful, indefinable creatures – especially in a place like the coast of Kenya where the traditionally patriarchal cultures of the African Mijikenda tribes prevail – is such a testament to all the possibilities of what a woman can do in a place where she is not actually permitted to do much. That is completely inspiring to me also as an artist. So that is why I dug into it." 
Wangechi Mutu
Source | anotherafrica.net

[© Wangechi Mutu. Even, 2014. ]
Image courtesy of Wangechi Mutu and Victoria Miro, London.
 
 ANOTHERAFRICA.NET |  TUMBLR |  FACEBOOK  |  TWITTER  |  INSTAGRAM

anotherafrica:

Wangechi Mutu Takes On Transmutation As a New Form of Existentialism

On the eve of Wangechi Mutu’s solo show, ‘Nguva na Nyoka’ (Sirens and Serpents) opening this October 14 2014 at London’s Victoria Miro gallery, the artist shared candid thoughts and insights on her latest body of work with Another Africa’s Joyce Bidouzo-Coudray much like what inspired her to delve into Kenya’s rich folkloric mythologies:

"The fact that women have this option to turn into these myths, these powerful, indefinable creatures – especially in a place like the coast of Kenya where the traditionally patriarchal cultures of the African Mijikenda tribes prevail – is such a testament to all the possibilities of what a woman can do in a place where she is not actually permitted to do much. That is completely inspiring to me also as an artist. So that is why I dug into it."

Wangechi Mutu

Source | anotherafrica.net

[© Wangechi Mutu. Even, 2014. ]

Image courtesy of Wangechi Mutu and Victoria Miro, London.

 

ANOTHERAFRICA.NET | TUMBLR | FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM

daughterofzami:

"The Black Panthers have never viewed such paramilitary groups as the Ku Klux Klan or the Minutemen as particularly dangerous. The real danger comes from highly organized Establishment forces -the local police, the National Guard, and the United States military. They were the ones who devastated Watts and killed innocent people. In comparison to them the paramilitary groups are insignificant. In fact, these groups are hardly organized at all. It is the uniformed men who are dangerous and who come into our communities every day to commit violence against us, knowing that the laws will protect them.” - Huey P. Newton, Sacramento and the “Panther Bill”

daughterofzami:

"The Black Panthers have never viewed such paramilitary groups as the Ku Klux Klan or the Minutemen as particularly dangerous. The real danger comes from highly organized Establishment forces -the local police, the National Guard, and the United States military. They were the ones who devastated Watts and killed innocent people. In comparison to them the paramilitary groups are insignificant. In fact, these groups are hardly organized at all. It is the uniformed men who are dangerous and who come into our communities every day to commit violence against us, knowing that the laws will protect them.” 

- Huey P. Newton, Sacramento and the “Panther Bill”

(via aaww-nyc)

Vote Now- Get Trans Lives Matter on PBS -

blackfilm:

Vote Now- Get Trans Lives Matter on PBS

My short Trans Lives Matter! Justice for Islan Nettles is in the running to air on PBS. 

Official Selection of PBS Reel 13’s weekly short film contest, dedicated to the best in short film.  October 2014 is  “AFROPUNK Month.” Voting begins Now & continues through Wednesday, October 22nd  at 5pm NYC time. Vote more than once.
Get my work on PBS as part of Reel 13 on Channel Thirteen.

 I know we can make this happen. Please forward widely.

http://www.thirteen.org/reel13/vote/

Trans Lives Matter! Justice for Islan Nettles.

Synopsis
A powerful and intensely moving document of a community vigil for Islan Nettles a transgender Womyn of Color. Because the brutal and increasing attacks on Trans Womyn of Color are outrageous their oppression causes outrage. Because healing and action tighten our fists and boom our voices. -supported by Ciy Lore & Bronx Documentary Center (BDC)

“Human trafficking, whether for sex or labor, is the number one issue facing women in the world. We think there is a central moral challenge of our time: It’s the brutality that so many people face in our time because of their gender.” — Sheryl WuDunn, the first Asian American reporter to win a Pulitzer Prize, during a speech at UW - Eau Claire (via 18mr)

(via fascinasians)

robin-sparkles:

Oh man, I cried so hard when Fred got eliminated from America’s Next Top Model.

robin-sparkles:

Oh man, I cried so hard when Fred got eliminated from America’s Next Top Model.

(via thepsychicclam)

Oct 20

cw-shows:

What does Hollywood typically get wrong about Latino portrayals? That we all walk around with a sombrero on our head, a jalapeño in our hand and a taco in the other one. That’s never been reality. We all are proud of where we come from, no matter what religion or culture we’re in. We all love our family; we all love our tradition. That pride does not go anywhere. But do we wear a flag on our shoulder? No. Are we always speaking Spanish and pregnant? No. That is so very far few and between, and that goes across the board. There is nobody exempt of going through hardships or going through success. What we get incorrect in this industry is that the Latino story is different than any other story. Or the black story is any different than any other story. We don’t want to only be limited to our world, or our skin color. We want to transcend. We want to be invited to the same party as everybody else. (x)

cw-shows:

What does Hollywood typically get wrong about Latino portrayals? That we all walk around with a sombrero on our head, a jalapeño in our hand and a taco in the other one. That’s never been reality. We all are proud of where we come from, no matter what religion or culture we’re in. We all love our family; we all love our tradition. That pride does not go anywhere. But do we wear a flag on our shoulder? No. Are we always speaking Spanish and pregnant? No. That is so very far few and between, and that goes across the board. There is nobody exempt of going through hardships or going through success. What we get incorrect in this industry is that the Latino story is different than any other story. Or the black story is any different than any other story. We don’t want to only be limited to our world, or our skin color. We want to transcend. We want to be invited to the same party as everybody else. (x)

(via heroics)

the-disney-elite:

We all knew it was coming, but here’s the first *official* announcement.
(For more info on Moana, click here.)

the-disney-elite:

We all knew it was coming, but here’s the first *official* announcement.

(For more info on Moana, click here.)

(via fyeahlilbit3point0)

I did go to school for Marine Biology, but the cool thing is… the greatest thing for me is that Polynesians, our gods, Kahoali, Maui, all these water gods, so it’s really cool and a honor to be playing a [water] character. And there’s not too many brown superheroes, so I’m really looking forward to representing the Polynesians, the natives.

My family are some of the greatest water men on earth. I’m not, but I’m going to go train with them. But it’s really an honor just being a Polynesian. And water is the most important thing in this world and we all know it. It’s cool be a part of DC’s universe.

” — Jason Momoa on getting to play Aquaman

(Source: fyeahlilbit3point0)

[video]

How Jimi Hendrix's race became his 'invisible legacy' -

(Source: blackrockandrollmusic, via popthirdworld)